January 2018: Ten Project Management Fallacies (Rick Brenner)

Speaker: Rick Brenner
Date: Tuesday – January 16, 2018
Agenda: 6:00-6:45 Networking, FREE PIZZA and Roundtables
6:45-7:00 Opening Announcements
7:00-8:20 Featured Presentation
8:20-8:30 Closing Announcements
Who’s Invited: Everyone (industry, government, academia)
Location: The MITRE Corporation
Building S
202 Burlington Rd. (Rt. 62)
Bedford, MA 01730
More Info: For SPIN info, contact the SPIN Chairperson.
Boston SPIN meetings are free. No RSVP is necessary.
Cancellations will be announced.
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NOTE:
 The earliest arrival time at MITRE is 5:15pm, no one will be admitted prior to that time. Because of security concerns, you will need to present a Picture ID to the MITRE Security Department in the lobby and any large items you bring will be opened and inspected. The building is secured at 8:30pm. All attendees must have left the building by that time.

Important additional information for foreign nationals: Any foreign national attending meetings anywhere within MITRE need to give 10 days’ notice to the Security Department before they show up in the lobby; otherwise they will be turned away. If you are a foreign national desiring to attend this Boston SPIN meeting please email Ken Palmer, kpalmer@mitre.org, or Roy Lane, rlane@mitre.org, more than 10 days prior to the meeting so they can get paperwork submitted within the required time frame. Be sure to bring both a picture ID and visa/”Green Card” information with you to the meeting to present to the MITRE Security Department in the lobby.

Featured Presentation: Ten Project Management Fallacies

Most of what we know about managing projects is useful and effective, but some of what we know “just ain’t so.” Identifying the fallacies of project management reduces risk and enhances your ability to complete projects successfully. Even more important, avoiding these traps can demonstrate your personal capabilities. In this program we describe ten of these beliefs. There are almost certainly many more, but these ten are a good start. We’ll explore the situations where these fallacies are most likely to expose projects to risk, and suggest techniques for avoiding them.

About the Speaker

Rick Brenner is principal of Chaco Canyon Consulting. He works with people in dynamic problem-solving organizations that are making products so novel or complex that they need state-of-the-art teamwork and stronger relationships among their people. In his 25 years as a software developer, project manager, software development manager, entrepreneur, consultant, and coach, he has developed valuable insights into the interactions between people in complex dynamic environments, and between people and the media in which they work.

As a coach, he works with managers at all levels, emphasizing development of interpersonal skills, especially in fluid, high-stress contexts, such as organizations that are moving from a strict operational orientation to one in which ongoing operations must compete for resources with special enterprise-scale projects. Such a mixed environment creates organizational stresses that leaders must understand, not only because of the change-related issues that arise, but also because of the challenges to managers that they create, even when equilibrium is attained.

Over a period of seven years, he attended or assisted in numerous workshops under Jerry Weinberg, Dani Weinberg, and Jean McLendon. It was during this period that he acquired his skills in designing and facilitating experiential education. He was a founding member of the AYE Conference.

 

Mr. Brenner has held positions at Symbolics, Inc., and at Draper Laboratory, both of Cambridge, Massachusetts. At Symbolics, he was responsible for development of products based on Macsyma, a computer algebra system. At Draper, he was a principal investigator in a DARPA program, the Evolutionary Design of Complex Software, where he conducted research into advanced concepts for software de- velopment environments based on dynamic object-oriented programming lan- guages. From 1993 to 2014, he taught Spreadsheet Models for Managers, a course he devised, at the Harvard University Extension School.

 

He serves as the facilitator and group administrator for a discussion group he created at LinkedIn.com: Office Politics, Workplace Politics, and Organizational Politics. Discussions there are energetic and enlightening. The group now has over 750 members.

 

Mr. Brenner holds a Masters Degree in Electrical Engineering from MIT. He is a member of the National Speakers Association (NSA), the Boston Software Process Improvement Network, and the Agile New England Chapter of the Association for Computing Machinery. He has served in various leadership roles ranging from board member to vice president to chair (president) in local chapters of these societies. He was selected Chapter Member of the Year for NSA New England in 2001 and 2007. He is a member of the Project Management Institute.

 

His current interests focus on improving personal and organizational effectiveness in abnormal situations, such as dramatic change, enterprise emergencies, and high-pressure project environments. He has written a number of essays on these subjects, available at his Web site, www.ChacoCanyon.com, and writes and publishes a free weekly email newsletter, Point Lookout, which now has just over 3,000 subscribers.