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Meeting Topic

Topic for February:
Date: Tuesday, February 15, 2005
Topic: Agile Management Methodologies
Speaker: Michael Mah

Abstract

Abstract: Agile Management Methodologies "Old Goats vs. Young Bucks"

A Young Goat's Observations on Productivity Metrics and Deadlines

Michael Mah will talk about agile development, agile project management, death-march projects, and the race for productivity.

For an organization to function optimally, it can not espouse agile development for its programmers, whether through Extreme Programming or other processes, while having non-agile, cumbersome decision making practices at the management level, when it comes to committing stressed-out teams to ambitious projects and unrealistic deadlines.

This talk will address the interdependence and synergy between agile management – how to make rapid, effective decisions on high pressure projects - with agile development, which is intended to improve productivity and quality. We’ll show *what agile management is*, and reveal the findings from real data on a company’s actual experience using Extreme Programming compared to traditional development.

Lastly, we'll discuss how to use this kind of information as a catalyst for change in an organization, and to better communicate and negotiate with senior management to make better promises and to meet our commitments.

About the Speaker

Michael Mah is a Senior Consultant with Cutter Consortium's Business Technology Trends & Impacts, Measurement and Benchmarking, Agile Software Development & Project Management, and Sourcing & Vendor Relationship Practices. He is a Managing Partner at QSM Associates Inc. based in Pittsfield, Massachusetts.

Michael's expertise is on the practical applications of software metrics, project estimation/control, IT productivity benchmarking, and relationship management.

He is a frequent speaker on negotiation and project estimation. He has a degree in electrical engineering from Tufts University, with a focus on electromagnetic physics and Far Eastern history. He is trained in mediation and conflict theory from the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School.

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