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Topic for January:
Date: January 17, 2006
Topic: Excess Friction: How Fast Deadlines Can Slow You Down & Ruin Your Life
Speaker: Michael Mah

Abstract

For those of us in the software field, high-pressure deadlines are a fact of life. In this environment - to build more and more in less and less time - there is a never ending push for higher productivity and faster schedules. However, data shows that there are, in fact, conditions where harsh deadlines actually cause lower productivity, longer schedules, and high conflict amongst a team - the exact opposite of what we're trying to achieve.

In this talk, Michael Mah will talk about "the cult of speed" and how overcoming this challenge is critical to the modern-day IT organization.

He will address how software managers can more effectively manage the high-tension pressures of work life in the Information Age, while maximizing chances for both project improvement success.

Please visit www.optimalfriction.com/ before the talk.

About the Speaker

Michael Mah is a contributing author of "IT Measurement, Advice from the Experts", Prentice Hall 2003, and the upcoming book, "Optimal Friction, People Dynamics at Work in the Information Age."

Michael also publishes his writings on-line through the Cutter Consortium as part of the Agile Software Development & Project Management Advisory Service, the Business-IT Strategies Advisory Service, Sourcing & Vendor Relationships Advisory Service, and the Business Technology Trends & Impacts Advisory Service.

His experience is in organizational development, IT negotiation, software project estimation, productivity benchmarking, outsourcing, risk management, and project "runaway prevention."

He has a degree in electrical engineering from Tufts University with a focus on electromagnetic physics and Far Eastern history.

He is trained in mediation and conflict resolution from the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

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